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The Joy of Tech® ‘Progress’

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via      the Comic Noggins of  Nitrozac  and  Snaggy  at  The Joy of Tech®

via the Comic Noggins of Nitrozac and Snaggy at The Joy of Tech®

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The post The Joy of Tech® ‘Progress’ appeared first on Security Boulevard.

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josephwebster
4 hours ago
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Denver, CO, USA
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After finding Alan Turing mementos in Colorado, U.S. wants to return seized items to U.K. school

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A U.S. woman who said she was visiting England to do a study of the late World War II codebreaker and computing pioneer Alan Turing walked into the prestigious boys’ boarding school he attended and asked to see a collection of his memorabilia.

She was given a wooden box with items that once belonged to Turing, who helped crack Nazi Germany’s secret codes and whose story inspired 2014’s Oscar-winning film “The Imitation Game.” Inside the box was his Ph.D. from Princeton University, his Order of the British Empire medal and other mementos.

When she left that day in 1984, the box was empty. The only thing left inside was a note asking for forgiveness and promising to return the items someday, according to a recent court filing by government lawyers.

More than 30 years later, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in Denver has the items that were seized from the Colorado home of the woman, who later changed her name to Julia Turing.

The Princeton degree was found behind a dresser in 2018. The medal, given for contributions to a field, and a letter from King George VI awarding the honor to Alan Turing was found in a briefcase behind a wall in a bathroom.

Her offer to donate the items to the University of Colorado had launched a lengthy international investigation to sort out the rightful owner of the items, according to a forfeiture action filed Jan. 17 and first reported by BizWest. The action is the first of two legal steps to return the memorabilia to the Sherborne School in England.

Julia Turing had letters from Sherborne’s treasurer, Col. A.W. Gallon, thanking her for previously returning most of the memorabilia and saying she could keep the diploma, according to court documents. They suggested she could show the correspondence to police if she was questioned.

But school officials told investigators that giving away any school property would require the permission of its board of governors, which did not consider the matter, according to Sherborne documents.

The school said some items that Julia Turing previously returned were not the original items that were taken. It noted that the Order of the British Empire medal she sent back was tarnished and did not include its miniature version and the king’s letter.

According to court documents, Julia Turing told investigators that she had bought OBE medals online, and several were found during the search of her home, along with the original discovered behind the bathroom wall.

In diaries and letters seized by investigators, she wrote of her “tremendous love and devotion” to Alan Turing and how she wished she did not have to hide his things. In one diary entry, addressed to Alan Turing, she worried about a museum forcing her to give up the items by claiming they are stolen, court documents show.

The U.S. government is asking a judge to give it permanent custody of the items so it can begin another legal process to return them to the school.

Julia Turing has until March to file an objection to the forfeiture. Her attorney, Katryna Spearman, did not return messages seeking comment. She has not been charged with a crime.

Sherborne School headmaster Dominic Luckett declined to comment Friday on the items removed from the school’s archives because authorities are still dealing with the matter.

Sherborne officials are proud of their distinguished alumnus and seek to preserve and promote his legacy, Luckett said in a statement to The Associated Press.

“As part of that, we take very seriously our responsibility to look after those items in our archives which relate to his time at Sherborne School and his subsequent life and work,” he added.

During World War II, Alan Turing helped crack Nazi secret codes by creating the “Turing bombe,” a forerunner of modern computers. After the war, he was prosecuted for homosexuality, then illegal in England, and forcibly treated with female hormones. He died in 1954 at age 41 after eating an apple laced with cyanide in what was ruled a suicide.

He received a posthumous apology from the British government in 2009 and a royal pardon in 2013.

Associated Press researcher Jennifer Farrar contributed to this report.



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josephwebster
14 days ago
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This may be one of the most bizarre stories I've ever read. And right here in Colorado.
Denver, CO, USA
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Alias Privacy “Parasite” 2.0

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WHAT IS ALIAS? Alias is a teachable “parasite” that gives you more control over your smart assistant’s customization and privacy. Through a simple app, you can train Alias to react to a self-chosen wake-word; once trained, Alias takes control over your home assistant by activating it for you. When you’re […]

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The post Alias Privacy “Parasite” 2.0 appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

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josephwebster
18 days ago
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This is awesome. I still don't trust those devices but this certainly is a step in the right direction.
Denver, CO, USA
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CADUS: A Crisis Response Makerspace In Berlin

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Trying to make the world a better place – not an unusual goal for a humanitarian aid organization. However, at CADUS we take the „making“ literally: in our Crisis Response Makerspace in Berlin, we innovate and build solutions for challenges in international emergency response. Projects range from soldering kits for […]

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The post CADUS: A Crisis Response Makerspace In Berlin appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

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josephwebster
33 days ago
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This is a terrific idea we could use some makerspaces like this in the US.
Denver, CO, USA
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A business card which runs Linux #Linux #MicroPython

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George Hilliard is an embedded systems engineer who spends a lot of time looking for things for use in future designs, or things that tickle a fancy:

One of those things is cheap Linux-capable computers, the cheaper the better. So I started diving into the very deep rabbit hole of obscure processors.

I thought to myself, “These processors are nearly cheap enough to give away.” After a while I hit upon the idea of making a barebones Linux board in a business card form factor.

As soon as I had the idea I thought it would be pretty cool to do. I have seen electronic business cards before, with various fun features including emulating USB flash drives, blinkenlights, or even wireless transceivers. I have never seen one running Linux, however. So I built one.

You can run all these from the emulated serial console after you log in (as root, the only user):

  • rogue: the classic Unix dungeon crawler.
  • 2048: a simple console mode 2048 game.
  • fortune: various pithy sayings. I decided not to include the entire database of quotes here to save space for other functionality.
  • micropython: a very small Python interpreter.

It has a USB port in the corner. If you plug it into a computer, it boots in about 6 seconds and shows up over USB as a flash drive and a virtual serial port that you can use to log into the card’s shell. The flash drive has a README file, a copy of George’s résumé and photography. The shell has several games and Unix classics such as fortune and rogue, a small 2048, and a small MicroPython interpreter.

Bill of Materials & Cost

I kept costs low. It’s cheap enough that I don’t feel bad giving it away, as designed! I’m not going to give one to absolutely everyone because it does take time to assemble each card, and assembly cost is not factored in here (my time is “free”).

Component Price
F1C100s $1.42
PCB $0.80
8MB flash $0.17
All other components $0.49
Total $2.88

See the entire project on the blog post here.

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JayM
52 days ago
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Cool
Atlanta, GA
josephwebster
52 days ago
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Denver, CO, USA
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Discovery Networks Changes the Rules for Composer Royalty Payments

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Shows on the Discovery Channel, Animal Planet, HGTV and Food Network may sound very different in the coming months. That’s because Discovery Networks, which owns those and other cable channels, is instituting a new pay policy that virtually assures no composer currently working on their programs will do so after Dec. 31.

Discovery has informed many of its top composers that, beginning in 2020, they must give up all performance royalties paid for U.S. airings, and that they must sign away their ability to collect royalties on all past shows on its networks.

Music makers surmise that the policy will result in an 80% to 90% drop in their income from these shows. It’s the last straw for many composers who say they will refuse to continue to score such series as “Gold Rush,” “Deadliest Catch” (pictured) and “Alaskan Bush People,” calling the new contract provisions “unprofessional,” “bullying,” “a corporate money grab” and “evil.”

The proposal is designed to circumvent the 100-year-old system whereby composers are compensated for use of their music in broadcast media. Those royalties are collected and distributed by performance-rights societies ASCAPBMI and SESAC.

Composer David Vanacore (“Fixer Upper”) says that initial fees are already so low that he and his peers rely on the so-called “back end” payments just to keep operating. “There is no way I can support what it takes to do a show based on what they’re offering,” he says. “I don’t think they understand the amount of time and energy that goes into the creative process.”

Discovery is requesting “direct source licenses” which will enable them to eliminate royalty payments. But composers say those royalties are vital to stay in business. What’s more, they fear that if this tactic is followed by other media outlets, making a living as a media composer in Los Angeles will eventually become impossible.

“All of the added musical value, bespoke musical branding and music scored to picture will not be financially supportable under the new proposed model,” said Didier Lean Rachou (“Gold Rush,” “Deadliest Catch”). “The Hollywood ecosystem of world-class mixers, assistants and musicians that I regularly use are no longer affordable for a small-business owner like myself.”

Composers have been offended by what they call “veiled threats” by Discovery executives that if they don’t take the new deal, their music will be stripped out of existing shows and replaced with generic library music that the network already owns.

Says one: “What they offered was paltry and pathetic. There was no financial component to compensate me for any domestic royalties they are asking me to sign away. If I accepted their withered carrots, they would then ask me to sign away all my past content. That was my retirement. There is absolutely no incentive for me to move forward with them.”

That “retirement,” according to Society of Composers and Lyricists President Ashley Irwin, is important to every film and TV composer because (unlike almost every other creative job in Hollywood) they have no union protection and the benefits that usually affords. “The closest thing we have to a pension plan is that royalty stream that comes through the performing-rights organizations. If that goes away, we’ll have nothing.”

Over the past 20 years, adds Mark T. Williams (“Betrayed”), composer fees (the “upfront” money) have declined by as much as 50 percent. “We rely on industry-standard practices of retaining our composers’ share of performing-rights and other royalty income,” he says. “Without that, we don’t have a sustainable business. We don’t just write a piece of music and spit it out. We’re composing, orchestrating, mixing, mastering, providing an entire service as well as support after the fact.” Williams estimates that an inability to collect domestic royalties would lead to an 82 percent decline in his income from Discovery series.

“This is deeply destructive,” offers Russell Emanuel, co-founder and chief creative at music production company Bleeding Fingers (which supplies music for “Alaskan Bush People”). “You cannot cut corners and be producing music at the top level. They’re not doing this to their acting or their voiceover talent.”

Discovery declined to make its music executives available for this story, but issued this statement: “Our 8,000 hours of original programming a year drives enormous economic value to the global music community. We compensate countless composers and musicians for their valued contributions, and will continue to do so.”

Some estimates suggest that avoiding ASCAPBMI and SESAC royalty payments might save them $25 million or so – less than 1 per cent of Discovery’s third-quarter 2019 revenue of nearly $2.68 billion.

Several composers and music attorneys told Variety that this initiative “sets a dangerous precedent.” They worry that inexperienced composers who agree to take this deal will erode long-held industry practices.

“What’s at stake here is the destruction of the creative process,” Vanacore says. “This is a downward spiral for all creative people.” And if Discovery follows through with its threat to remove all of the familiar themes from its series based on composers’ refusal to accept the new financial deal, “the shows will be damaged,” he adds.

Adds another veteran Discovery composer, who asked for anonymity: “the threat of having our series re-mixed with other music Discovery owns outright is unheard-of and would send a ripple effect throughout the industry.”

Several of these composers, and other high-profile composers who share their concerns, have banded together to launch a website, <a href="http://yourmusicyourfuture.com" rel="nofollow">yourmusicyourfuture.com</a>, designed to inform the media composing community of their rights and the possible ramifications of giving up the traditional “writer’s share” of royalties. More than 4,000 music-makers have signed up to support the initiative.

“What we have to do,” says Emanuel, “is make sure that new composers understand that this does damage beyond their scope.” Williams adds that the proposed deal, if accepted, “undermines composers as a whole. We don’t understand [Discovery’s] position and we don’t support it.”

All of the composers interviewed by Variety said they would be happy to continue working for the networks, and their producers, on these and other shows, but not if it means giving up the majority of their income to do so.

In a similar move, Netflix has attempted to convince composers to take the buyout but, sources say, generally back off those demands when composers (especially A-list names) balk.

Culled from variety.com

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josephwebster
57 days ago
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This totally bites. I'll definitely be watching this.
Denver, CO, USA
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