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The Singleton - Paragon of Time Collection

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A sensational release from The Singleton brand. Matured in a single hogshead cask and bottled at 40.6% abv, The Singleton of Dufftown 53 Year Old 1964 Vintage is the first in the whisky brand’s new Paragon of Time Collection.  This is a real rarity and a real collectors piece for those looking to add to their collection.

The 53 Year Old will be presented in a crystal decanter and housed in a wooden presentation case, with a piece of the original cask incorporated into the packaging.

The Singleton has also partnered with award-winning artist Cai Zhi Song to celebrate the release by creating a commemorative sculpture called Blossom. It surpasses the brand’s previous oldest release by some way.  Previously it was  the 40-year-old Glendullan single malt from the whisky’s Forgotten Drop series released in 2018.

The whisky is said to feature ‘scented hand-cream, rose water and exotic tropical and berry fruit’ notes on the nose, with ‘dried figs and a suggestion of toffee’ on the palate

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josephwebster
9 days ago
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I need this. And I can get free shipping since it's over 200 pounds sterling. By several orders of magnitude...
Denver, CO, USA
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Akamai to slow down video game downloads during COVID-19 outbreak

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Content delivery network (CDN) Akamai announced today plans to slow down video game downloads during peak hours in order to preserve bandwidth and avoid traffic congestions during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak.

"In regions where demand is creating bottlenecks for customers, we will be reducing gaming software downloads at peak times, completing the downloads at the normal fast speeds late at night," said Akamai CEO Tom Leighton.

The slowdown won't impact the act of playing a video game, which doesn't generate large quantities of network traffic. Instead, the slowdown will only impact downloads for online games and not other types of traffic.

While online streaming accounts for the vast majority of today's internet traffic, game updates and game downloads are notoriously difficult to handle for CDNs like Akamai and others.

These types of events tend to happen in giant spikes, as a new game or game update is released, and players rush to get it.

Deprioritizing this type of traffic means Akamai will be able to avoid sudden traffic spikes and prevent congestion for all the people working from home or to emergency services.

Akamai said the slowdowns will occur only in regions where traffic bottlenecks are developing and that it took the decision to slow down game download speeds together with Microsoft and Sony, the two companies that run today's top gaming platforms -- Xbox and PSN.

Both companies will be deploying their own set of countermeasures. Microsoft described the slowdown as temporary.

"We appreciate the collaboration with partners like Akamai to deliver the joy of games in these unprecedented times," said Dave McCarthy, Corporate Vice President, Xbox Product Services.

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josephwebster
9 days ago
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Damn.
Denver, CO, USA
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Zoom and Microsoft Teams Totter Under Strain of Coronavirus Demand

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The Register reported on March 16 that both Zoom and Microsoft Teams were stumbling under the strain of so many people working remotely. While Microsoft and Zoom have been building capacity rapidly, the flood of workers to video conferencing recently has been overwhelming.

No one is happy when there is an outage, but there have indeed been outages. Zoom candidly reported that its software has "degraded performance" and its phone service has a "partial outage." Take a look at social media which seems to confirm that the issue is widespread.

All remote working companies are scrambling to deal with the sudden flood of users. Zoom has updated its audio-conferencing system in the background in order to allow people running the meeting the ability to change dial-in options - a sign that people who usually do not use its software are having to be guided through it by manager and meeting organizers.

Zoom may have gotten a little overexcited: All its execs, CEO, CFO and CIO have been on a media blitz recently touting their low latency, network optimization, decision to remove a 40-minute limit on free accounts and even offering free video conferencing for schools.

Microsoft, which has been heavily promoting its Teams conferencing service recently, is also having issues, which a string of outages. The service was listed by Microsoft as suffering "degradation."

Cisco's Webex has been looking good and is reportedly handing the load well.

As The Register wryly noted, here are the sounds in the U.S. these days: "Can everyone hear me? Can everyone mute if they're not talking? Whoever has dogs, could they please move or turn off their mic?"

Sounds about right. <g>

Sharon D. Nelson, Esq., President, Sensei Enterprises, Inc.
3975 University Drive, Suite 225|Fairfax, VA 22030
Email: snelson@senseient.com Phone: 703-359-0700
Digital Forensics/Cybersecurity/Information Technology
https://senseient.com
https://twitter.com/sharonnelsonesq
https://www.linkedin.com/in/sharondnelson
https://amazon.com/author/sharonnelson

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josephwebster
14 days ago
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Denver, CO, USA
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The Joy of Tech® ‘Progress’

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via      the Comic Noggins of  Nitrozac  and  Snaggy  at  The Joy of Tech®

via the Comic Noggins of Nitrozac and Snaggy at The Joy of Tech®

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The post The Joy of Tech® ‘Progress’ appeared first on Security Boulevard.

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josephwebster
46 days ago
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Denver, CO, USA
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After finding Alan Turing mementos in Colorado, U.S. wants to return seized items to U.K. school

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A U.S. woman who said she was visiting England to do a study of the late World War II codebreaker and computing pioneer Alan Turing walked into the prestigious boys’ boarding school he attended and asked to see a collection of his memorabilia.

She was given a wooden box with items that once belonged to Turing, who helped crack Nazi Germany’s secret codes and whose story inspired 2014’s Oscar-winning film “The Imitation Game.” Inside the box was his Ph.D. from Princeton University, his Order of the British Empire medal and other mementos.

When she left that day in 1984, the box was empty. The only thing left inside was a note asking for forgiveness and promising to return the items someday, according to a recent court filing by government lawyers.

More than 30 years later, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in Denver has the items that were seized from the Colorado home of the woman, who later changed her name to Julia Turing.

The Princeton degree was found behind a dresser in 2018. The medal, given for contributions to a field, and a letter from King George VI awarding the honor to Alan Turing was found in a briefcase behind a wall in a bathroom.

Her offer to donate the items to the University of Colorado had launched a lengthy international investigation to sort out the rightful owner of the items, according to a forfeiture action filed Jan. 17 and first reported by BizWest. The action is the first of two legal steps to return the memorabilia to the Sherborne School in England.

Julia Turing had letters from Sherborne’s treasurer, Col. A.W. Gallon, thanking her for previously returning most of the memorabilia and saying she could keep the diploma, according to court documents. They suggested she could show the correspondence to police if she was questioned.

But school officials told investigators that giving away any school property would require the permission of its board of governors, which did not consider the matter, according to Sherborne documents.

The school said some items that Julia Turing previously returned were not the original items that were taken. It noted that the Order of the British Empire medal she sent back was tarnished and did not include its miniature version and the king’s letter.

According to court documents, Julia Turing told investigators that she had bought OBE medals online, and several were found during the search of her home, along with the original discovered behind the bathroom wall.

In diaries and letters seized by investigators, she wrote of her “tremendous love and devotion” to Alan Turing and how she wished she did not have to hide his things. In one diary entry, addressed to Alan Turing, she worried about a museum forcing her to give up the items by claiming they are stolen, court documents show.

The U.S. government is asking a judge to give it permanent custody of the items so it can begin another legal process to return them to the school.

Julia Turing has until March to file an objection to the forfeiture. Her attorney, Katryna Spearman, did not return messages seeking comment. She has not been charged with a crime.

Sherborne School headmaster Dominic Luckett declined to comment Friday on the items removed from the school’s archives because authorities are still dealing with the matter.

Sherborne officials are proud of their distinguished alumnus and seek to preserve and promote his legacy, Luckett said in a statement to The Associated Press.

“As part of that, we take very seriously our responsibility to look after those items in our archives which relate to his time at Sherborne School and his subsequent life and work,” he added.

During World War II, Alan Turing helped crack Nazi secret codes by creating the “Turing bombe,” a forerunner of modern computers. After the war, he was prosecuted for homosexuality, then illegal in England, and forcibly treated with female hormones. He died in 1954 at age 41 after eating an apple laced with cyanide in what was ruled a suicide.

He received a posthumous apology from the British government in 2009 and a royal pardon in 2013.

Associated Press researcher Jennifer Farrar contributed to this report.



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josephwebster
61 days ago
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This may be one of the most bizarre stories I've ever read. And right here in Colorado.
Denver, CO, USA
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Alias Privacy “Parasite” 2.0

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WHAT IS ALIAS? Alias is a teachable “parasite” that gives you more control over your smart assistant’s customization and privacy. Through a simple app, you can train Alias to react to a self-chosen wake-word; once trained, Alias takes control over your home assistant by activating it for you. When you’re […]

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The post Alias Privacy “Parasite” 2.0 appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

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josephwebster
65 days ago
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This is awesome. I still don't trust those devices but this certainly is a step in the right direction.
Denver, CO, USA
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